Hosting Node.js Ghost

Over at Tech I wrote about my Ghost weblog setup in Web Server 101 for Ghost.

It was actually an interesting technical challenge that forced me to move beyond my comfort zone a time or two. When it comes to my web server, I'm inherently cautious (nee paranoid), and only tinker in the innards with great reluctance.

Still, I'm surprised by how much fun I had tinkering in the innards. Maybe I need to do innards tinkering more often.

Web Server 101 for Ghost

Recently I installed Ghost on my server. Ghost is a Node.js weblogging tool that you can host yourself or have another organization host for you.

It's not a complicated application to install. There's even a How to Install Ghost web site, with handy instructions for installing Ghost in various environments.

Take my environment, which is Ubuntu Linux hosted on a Linode VPS. You could order a brand new VPS, but chances are your server is already set up, and you're just looking to install Ghost.

You have to install Node.js first, of course. Then you download the Ghost source code, and install the application, using the following steps:

Busted

If you're going to whine about how hard is to to provide data in an Excel spreadsheet fomat, you may not want to do so to a judge who is famous for his e-discovery expertise.

Don't Mess with One of the E-Discovery Triumvirate.

Don't Mess with one of the E-Discovery Triumvirate

I dabble more than a little in the legal world, but that's OK, because the legal world dabbles quite heavily in the world of technology. Nowadays, metadata is the smoking gun in court, and e-discovery is the ballistics test that uncovers it.

The concept of e-discovery, or electronic discovery is simple: it is the discovery, identification, and production of electronically stored information (ESI). However, the execution can be involved, complex, and frequently contentious.

Take for example something seemingly simple and benign: the keyword search. If you and I want to find out about something online, we open up Google or Bing and type in some words, such as "e-discovery keyword search". We typically get back a ton of links, in order of relevancy. We pick and choose from among the links to find what we need. Rarely do we have to go beyond the first few pages to get the information or resources we're looking for.

JavaScript, not a real language...

Simon St. Laurent and I have been discussing that exciting upcoming conference, DHTMLConf.

Party like golden sparkles following the mouse cursor is cool again!

If you're going to JSFest, how can you not go to DHTMLConf? This is a conference celebrating a time when all of the technologies we take so seriously now, were fun!

Simon is going, and is taking along a copy of his old Dynamic HTML book he managed to find. That made me dig around online for anything on my old books, including my Dynamic HTML book (1998), as well as my earlier (1996) JavaScript How-To.

I had to laugh when I saw the marketing blurb attached to the JavaScript How-To book at Amazon:

Koster's Missouri Egg Challenge

caged henUpdate: On March 20th, the plaintiffs in one of the cases (Rocky Mountain Farmers Union et al v Corey et al) referenced in this work, has petitioned the Supreme Court to hear its appeal.

Friday Promises

Lately most of my writing has been on other topics, but I'm not abandoning my tech writing. I actually have two writings that are tech related in the works.

One is about Node, Ghost, and what happens when you remove the Apache wall that typically protects most of our web application work. The other is near and dear to my heart because it combines my interest in technology and my ongoing coverage of the Ringling Brothers circus/animal welfare court cases. Yeah, how great is that? RICO and tech in the same writing?

Of course, I also have other works in the hopper.

(Isn't that a cool word? Hopper? It's so appropriate for writers who procrastinate. "Get that SOB into the hopper and get it out the door, you lazy sod!")

Donate to a cause and get hauled into court

Ringling circus elephant and bullhookFeld Entertainment, Inc (FEI), owner of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus, is attempting to coerce confidential donor lists from the animal welfare groups it has battled with for 13+ years in the DC federal courts. FEI's lawyers are doing so in an attempt to prove that the animal welfare organizations it's suing—the Humane Society of the United States, Animal Welfare Institute, Fund for Animals, Born Free USA, and the Wildlife Advocacy Project—engaged in "donor fraud" in their solicitation of funds to continue their battle to help circus elephants.

Why does it want the list of donors? Why, to reach out to them, of course...

Ringling Brothers parent company going after advocacy group donor lists

Ringling circus elephant and bullhookFeld Entertainment, Inc (FEI), owner of the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus, is attempting to coerce confidential donor lists from the animal welfare groups it has battled with for 13+ years in the DC federal courts. FEI's lawyers are doing so in an attempt to prove that the animal welfare organizations it's suing—the Humane Society of the United States, Animal Welfare Institute, Fund for Animals, Born Free USA, and the Wildlife Advocacy Project—engaged in "donor fraud" in their solicitation of funds to continue their battle to help circus elephants.

Specifically, FEI's discovery request demands the following:

Of Mice and Men, Circus Elephants, and Books

The intent was to finish my book on the Ringling Brothers animal welfare court cases by year end. After all, the cases have settled down into an analysis of legal fees, and long, silent periods reflecting discovery, with a trial date a year or two (or three) into the future. Publish now, incorporate an epilogue into the e-book when all is said and done, and I'll have managed to write about an ongoing legal case and still keep readers updated.

Then I found out Tom Rider died, and everything has changed.

"Bitch" in Cages at Burningbird

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