Donate to a Cause...End up in Court

Think back on the last donation you made for a cause...Imagine that eight years after you made the donation, you get a legal letter or subpoena from an intimidating Washington DC law firm representing the coal plant or oil company, informing you you're going to be deposed and/or forced to appear in court in an ongoing racketeering lawsuit against the organization you supported. Said lawyers will explain that they are seeking co-plaintiffs in their multimillion dollar lawsuit, with an implication underlying the communication that if you're not with us, you're agin us.

Read more at Judge Strikes Blow Against Activist Groups.

Judge Strikes Blow Against Groups

Think back on the last donation you made for a cause. Perhaps it was to the Natural Resource Defense Council to aid them in their court battle to protect the Palisades Interstate Park. Maybe it was to the Sierra Club, to support its Clean Air Act lawsuit against a Montana coal-fired power plant, or to any organization or individual battling Chevron in its epic, and manic court fight against Ecuadorians, lawyers, journalists, film makers, big tech companies, and most US environmentalists.

The donation was made. Your side of the court battle will win, or it won't. End of story. Or at least, you think it's the end of the story.

What's a few cement blocks between friends

Over at Bad Kitty, Fox falls all over itself to condemn the EPA...again.

Fox just published a story about a poor blue collar in Wyoming, threatened with horrific fines for building an environmentally friendly little pond on his land...

The only problem is, the story is as much fiction as fact. Two minutes is all it took to locate the EPA letter of violation. And the letter tells a different story.

Fox falls all over itself to condemn the EPA...again

update March 22

A story in a local news station provides both video and photos of the "little pond".

That's no pond, it's a bloody lake. It has a dock. A dock.

This is a contrived controversy.

Earlier coverage

Fox just published a story about a poor blue collar in Wyoming, threatened with horrific fines for building an environmentally friendly little pond on his land.

Wyoming welder faces $75,000 a day in EPA fines for building pond on his property goes the headline, and I'm sure the folks at Pacific Legal Foundation are on a plane, right now, racing to the location in order to represent the family in a lawsuit against the EPA.

According to Fox:

Hosting Node.js Ghost

Over at Tech I wrote about my Ghost weblog setup in Web Server 101 for Ghost.

It was actually an interesting technical challenge that forced me to move beyond my comfort zone a time or two. When it comes to my web server, I'm inherently cautious (nee paranoid), and only tinker in the innards with great reluctance.

Still, I'm surprised by how much fun I had tinkering in the innards. Maybe I need to do innards tinkering more often.

Web Server 101 for Ghost

Recently I installed Ghost on my server. Ghost is a Node.js weblogging tool that you can host yourself or have another organization host for you.

It's not a complicated application to install. There's even a How to Install Ghost web site, with handy instructions for installing Ghost in various environments.

Take my environment, which is Ubuntu Linux hosted on a Linode VPS. You could order a brand new VPS, but chances are your server is already set up, and you're just looking to install Ghost.

You have to install Node.js first, of course. Then you download the Ghost source code, and install the application, using the following steps:

Busted

If you're going to whine about how hard is to to provide data in an Excel spreadsheet fomat, you may not want to do so to a judge who is famous for his e-discovery expertise.

Don't Mess with One of the E-Discovery Triumvirate.

Don't Mess with one of the E-Discovery Triumvirate

I dabble more than a little in the legal world, but that's OK, because the legal world dabbles quite heavily in the world of technology. Nowadays, metadata is the smoking gun in court, and e-discovery is the ballistics test that uncovers it.

The concept of e-discovery, or electronic discovery is simple: it is the discovery, identification, and production of electronically stored information (ESI). However, the execution can be involved, complex, and frequently contentious.

Take for example something seemingly simple and benign: the keyword search. If you and I want to find out about something online, we open up Google or Bing and type in some words, such as "e-discovery keyword search". We typically get back a ton of links, in order of relevancy. We pick and choose from among the links to find what we need. Rarely do we have to go beyond the first few pages to get the information or resources we're looking for.

JavaScript, not a real language...

Simon St. Laurent and I have been discussing that exciting upcoming conference, DHTMLConf.

Party like golden sparkles following the mouse cursor is cool again!

If you're going to JSFest, how can you not go to DHTMLConf? This is a conference celebrating a time when all of the technologies we take so seriously now, were fun!

Simon is going, and is taking along a copy of his old Dynamic HTML book he managed to find. That made me dig around online for anything on my old books, including my Dynamic HTML book (1998), as well as my earlier (1996) JavaScript How-To.

I had to laugh when I saw the marketing blurb attached to the JavaScript How-To book at Amazon:

Koster's Missouri Egg Challenge

caged henUpdate: On March 20th, the plaintiffs in one of the cases (Rocky Mountain Farmers Union et al v Corey et al) referenced in this work, has petitioned the Supreme Court to hear its appeal.

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