Categories
HTML5 W3C

This week in HTML5 in verse

This week in HTML5…in verse.

So <time> is saved
though it may be changed,
and <data> is on the horizon.

<hgroup> is going,
you can hear it moaning,
as HTML5 continues to wizen.
Categories
Specs W3C

Responding to Opera’s TPAC Minutes

TPAC is the W3C annual meeting where the various working group members gather in bloody battle to see who emerges victorious…and who then has to buy the beer.

I’ve just published my response—in my usual quietly thoughtful manner—to Opera employee notes from the meeting at RealTech.

Categories
HTML5 Specs W3C

Correction to the HTML5 review procedure

In my earlier writing, I suggested that after October 1st, people with comments should send emails to the public-html-comment email list, as I thought this would be where Last Call comments would be addressed. Evidently, I was incorrect.

According to a clarification I received, all comments should be submitted to the Bugzilla database. In addition, any arguments should be presented in the Bugzilla database. The HTML WG will be tracking using the Bugzilla database, unless the resolution makes people unhappy, in which case the item will become an issue. When an item does become an issue, then the only way you can continue to participate is basically become a member of the group. Oh, any comment in the public email list is supposedly addressed, but discussion will most likely happen in the members-only email list.

I’m not sure how comments from other W3C groups will be handled—perhaps by Ouija board; maybe strips of paper tacked against a wall, and thrown darts.

If you get from my comments that I don’t like this process, I don’t. A bugzilla database is not the place to handle concerns or suggestions that aren’t editorial or corrective in nature. It’s difficult to follow the discussion, and most of the discussion takes place out of the public eye. In addition, you can’t thread the replies, which means everything gets smooshed together linearly, with a lot of message copying, and references to “Comment Number 14”. Bugzilla is also not the most accessible software in the world.

Relying on Bugzilla to manage Last Call comments sucks. It’s also demonstrative of a group that has not effectively dealt with conflict. Instead of dealing with the major issues—such as the continuing split of the document across W3C and WhatWG, or the disquieting trends reflected in accessibility bugs—the HTML WG has, instead, tried to get technology to take care of the problem. And you know something? Relying on technology in this way never works.

You can track Bugzilla Tracking, or you can subscribe to the email list, but I’d do so warily—it is going to get busy.