Integrating WordPress’ Multisite support

In the past, I’ve skipped between supporting multiple sites and only having a single site, here at Burningbird.

I like different domains and sites so that people can focus primarily on the topics they like. For instance, tech people may get a bit tired of my political writings, and those interested in the political writings may not care for in-depth overviews of JavaScript.

The main issue with multiple sites, though, is the amount of work to maintain the software for each site. In fact, that’s been a real pain in the past, and the reason I took down the individual sites.

Thankfully, WordPress has very good multisite support now. I can support different sites with different domain names, and you all have no idea it’s all fed by the same WordPress installation. More importantly, if I decide to subscribe to a security system for my site, such as Wordfence, I only need one subscription. Considering how much my site gets hammered on a daily basis, I’m definitely interested in increasing my security. However, security API keys are not cheap. They’re too expensive to get one for every domain.

I’m also eliminating all statically generated web pages. I just wiped out the old weblog.burningbird.net site. I thought about keeping some of the old content but then realized people have enough stuff to read, they don’t need to see stuff that’s 15 years old. In addition, I’m adding newer statically generated content into WordPress, in preparation for converting everything over to the secure version of HTTP, HTTPS.

As I add active content to new sites, I’ll post a note linking to them. Right now, I have active content here and at One Lawsuit.

They… are watching you

Today, Trump is likely to sign the latest in Congressional Review Act bills, this one to overturn a new FCC rule that would force ISPs to get permission from users to collect and share personal information.

The Senate was the first to toss the privacy rule, followed by the House. The vote was along party lines. Kudos to the Democrats for looking out for us, but the party-line Republican vote was a little surprising considering the number of libertarians among the Republicans. Libertarians have a real thing for privacy. I expect Rand Paul will have some explaining to do the next time he runs for re-election.

Continue reading “They… are watching you”

Tech: A Welcome Respite

HTML5 logo with cat claw scratch

It’s long past time for me to return to technical writing, if only because I need a respite from the battle against Trump and his evil minions.

It helps that there is a lot to be excited about—in a good way—in the tech world. The Node community seems to be moving beyond its early growing pains and is starting to stabilize. There’s still occasional drama, but not enough to make you scream in horror and run away.

My beloved SVG is really coming into its own with widespread support. I’ve been waiting years for this. There are great libraries to make it easier to build applications, but for me, the holdup has always been browser support. Now, I can party.

CSS! Can you believe what you can do with CSS now?  Not to mention that the W3C has really its act together when it comes to documenting what’s happening with specs.

Speaking of specs…HTML is no longer held hostage by a tin-plated dictator.  I’m sorry, did I say that out loud? I did notice that the working group mailing list is extremely quiet nowadays. This is because all the action has moved to GitHub. Probably more efficient. Not as fun.

Excellent news about the W3C and IDPF merging their efforts.

The vision to align Publishing and Web technologies and create a new roadmap for the future of publishing became official today with the announcement that the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF) have combined organizations.

 

OnHub: Google’s Newest Miss/Hit?

OnHub

Google is known for many things, including being wildly successful and a major cultural impact. But its path is also littered by the skeletal remains of failed projects.

Search, Maps, GMail, Chrome, Android, and some of the Nexus devices—not to mention its acquisition of the ubiquitous YouTube, as well as a successful set of hardware with recent purchases of Nest and Dropcam—are decided hits. But they’re matched by the misses, including Dodgeball, Notebook, Wave, Lively, Nexus Q, and Google Glasses. Reader was successful software that Google abandoned, and Google+ never has achieved the reach of Facebook.

Now we have a new entry into the Google sphere of products in which to dominate the world: OnHub. The question becomes, will it be a hit? Or another miss?

Continue reading “OnHub: Google’s Newest Miss/Hit?”

My Current Version of Learning Node

Orangutan laying on grass looking at camera

As we finished up Learning Node, 2nd, the Node.js Foundation released Node version 6. I quickly did a run through to see if I needed to modify the book text. Yes, indeed, I did.

One of the major changes was how new Buffers are created. This is a major change, considering how integral Buffers are to Node. I hastily re-wrote the section on Buffers in the book, noting that the existing examples demonstrate how to create a Buffer in Node 4.x, but not Node 6.x and later. I also provided additional examples for Node 6.x.

Another major change was how to refer to the fast lane version of Node.js, originally called “Node Stable”. Now, it’s referred to as “Node Current”.

I may have influenced this change. I filed bugs last year about the Node documentation.  One bug had to do with the confusion surrounding which version of Node should be the “default” API.

The Node.js Foundation recommends the LTS versions for production use, because of their long-term stability (hence the name). However, if you access API documentation for Node.js directly, such as searching for Buffer in Google, you’ll get the new Current version.

We went back and forth in the comments about the problems inherent with having the least stable API as the default documented API. I also repeatedly pointed out the problems when you have multiple “current” versions of Node (LTS and Stable), and how would people know which is the current version of Node.js?

To be honest, I didn’t see renaming Stable to Current to be one of the possible solutions. That’s a bit like sweeping dirt under the rug. Oh look! We can’t see the dirt now!

Back to finishing up the book. I quickly changed Stable to Current where applicable. What’s done is done. I hope the book does well.

This is my last book on Node. I may, in the future, write other books on technology, but not Node. Change is the byword for the Node community and that doesn’t translate well when it comes to writing books. I will, eventually, return to technical writing here at Burningbird in addition to my other writing, and I will write about Node. But no books.

And when I write on Node, it will be the current version. Whatever that may be.