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Healthcare

About my healthcare exchange promise—I lied

I promised you wouldn’t write about the Healthcare Exchange…but I lied.

Today, I am officially enrolled in an affordable healthcare plan via the federal Healthcare Exchange.

Though the GOP has worked tirelessly to ensure I not get this far, I persevered and made it. Though I realize the GOP is still doing everything in its power to ensure I don’t have healthcare coverage come this January, at this moment, I am covered. I have what every Republican Congressional member has, but doesn’t want me to have: healthcare coverage.

I will be able to go to the doctor when I’m sick. I will be able to get the medical care I need in order to survive. And I won’t be filing for bankruptcy if I do get sick.

My statement to the GOP on Twitter was heartfelt but a little severe. I want to take this time to provide a more measured statement…

For years you tried to stop me getting healthcare coverage, but you have failed. You actually brought the government to the edge of financial disaster to keep like me from getting healthcare coverage, but you have failed. Even now, you’re scrambling to file lawsuits in attempt to prevent me from having healthcare coverage, but those are tomorrow’s battles. For today, you can’t take away my healthcare coverage, and you have failed.

 

Neener neener.

all complete notice

Now, I return to my previously made promise to not talk about the Healthcare Exchange.

Thank you.

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Healthcare

Healthcare Exchange: 1 Shelley: 0

I joined the masses in attempting to access the new Healthcare Exchange yesterday. I thought I had an edge by creating an account with the system a few weeks back, but no such luck. Attempting to log in kept resulting in a blank page (which showed itself to be a “downstream error” when accessing the site using Firefox).

I noticed that the format of username that was acceptable a few weeks back no longer meets the criteria for new user names, so I don’t know if I have an account or not. And forget trying to use Chat to verify whether I need to create a new account, or can use my existing one (with its improper username format).

I expected glitches, but not such wide systematic failures, where people can’t even get access to the security questions to create an account. This breakdown isn’t the fault of Obamacare. This breakdown is, unfortunately, all too typical with large new systems developed with too many inputs from middle management and too little heed paid to experienced software developers. And way too little effective load testing.

Using Java doesn’t help. Java requires a very savvy tech architect, and well designed infrastructure. Even tiny fractures can cause big pile ups in a poorly designed Java system.

Regardless, I’m not going to bash the law just because of early system failures. I’m irritated at journalists and their pondering of “people giving up” because they can’t access the system. Hey boys and girls: people who want and need affordable healthcare coverage aren’t going to give up because of software glitches. Perhaps if the pundits would stop talking and start listening, they wouldn’t write or say such silly crap.

However, someone needs to be kicked in the ass behind the scenes of the Healthcare Marketplace.

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Healthcare

Here come the unwashed masses

ratty fur coatMy roommate was surprised by a card he received from his doctor this week. The doctor stated he was changing the way his practice worked, in order to provide a more “personalized approach”. There will be time to really discuss medical needs, the card noted. The appointments will be unhurried and quickly obtained.

“To achieve these goals, my practice size will be smaller and there will be an annual fee.”

The return address listed a Specialdocs Consultants. A quick look up on Google told us all we needed to know: Roomie’s doctor is going concierge. Going concierge just in time to avoid the unwashed masses who promise to invade medical offices next year thanks to the Affordable Care Act.

The unwashed masses…that’s folks like you and me who for whatever reason, don’t currently have medical insurance. For all the lofty rants about freedom and liberty echoed by those who fought against Obamacare the last few years, bottom line is much of the pushback is coming from folks who don’t want to have to compete for medical care with the additional 10-15% more of Americans who will soon be able to get healthcare when they need it. And compete we all will, if the medical profession meets the newly insured by fleeing to walled practices, doors open only at the ka-ching of a dropped coin.

What can we expect from these new, walled practices?

Lest you’re thinking Royal Pains, and doctors that come to your home (and who also donate much of their free time to treating those who can’t afford their services), the reality is that you’ll still need to visit the doctor in his or her office. However, you will most likely be able to get an appointment more quickly, and yes, the doctor will be able to spend more time discussing your health issues with you. But you’ll get all of this only after you pay a hefty premium. In the St. Louis area, average concierge fees run between $1500.00 and $2000.00 a year.

In a glowing opinion piece on concierge medicine, a doctor writing for Forbes magazine implied that the fees paid are “within the means of most middle class families”. However, there are few families I know that can quickly and easily absorb an extra $150 or more a month, just for the honor of being able to call in for an appointment. For all that doctors bitch about receiving less money from Medicare, they still are doing much better than the average middle class family, whose income has remained fixed as grocery and other costs have increased.

What we’re seeing is the beginning of a class system within the medical industry, with the wealthier having quick access to medical care, while the rest of us scrape by, getting whatever we can get. Of course, there’s always been a class system in the medical industry, but now it’s more obvious.

In the Forbes piece, the doctor wrote:

Over the next decade, we will likely see the evolution of primary care delivery into two tracks. Some patients receive high-quality care from happy, motivated concierge doctors, whereas others will have to make do with rushed “assembly line” care from overworked providers trying to get their patients in and out the door as quickly as possible.

Over the next decade what we’ll see is a different attitude towards the medical community, thanks in part to these new walled off medical practices. Gone will be the days when doctors are treated like Gods. More people will get their medical advice from Dr. Google, than from Dr. Baker or Dr. Hsieh. We’ll also be seeing more of nurse practitioners and physician assistants than doctors, which is a trend we should encourage. Gone, too, are the days when we just accept whatever the doctor says—whether she says it in 10 minutes or 30.

We’re already seeing a change in how we view medicine. Rather than rush in and get antibiotics any time we or our kids get a sniffle, we suck it up and drink our orange juice. We’ve found that antibiotics have been over-prescribed in the last few decades, leading to antibiotic resistant infections that, unlike the common cold, can kill us.

We’re discovering that many of those medical tests our doctors want us to take are unnecessary, or could be replaced by less expensive alternatives. We’re even discovering that the annual physical that we’ve been told is absolutely necessary for good health may not be necessary after all for many of us. As for treating the measles or the mumps, most parents get their kids immunized, and do so at the local school or pharmacy, not the doctor’s office.

(Well, most parents that don’t belong to certain churches. that is.)

We already know what we need to do to be healthier in this country. We need to eat less processed, fat and sugar laden foods We need to lose weight. We need to quit smoking, and not drink so much. We certainly shouldn’t take Molly, or whatever “kill me” drug is currently popular.

We need to get off the couch and walk. And when we walk, we need to turn off the damn phones. We’d do better spending that $2000 on a relaxing vacation or fun new hobby than paying a concierge fee.

In other words, we need to practice common sense when it comes to our health. We don’t need a doctor telling us what we already know if we’d only be honest with ourselves.

So, we need our doctors, true, but we need to work on needing them a lot less. Maybe then the doctors won’t flee from us in terror.

Is roomie going to pay the fee? He visits the doctor once a year. He isn’t particularly fond of him. He certainly doesn’t like him well enough to pay for the privilege of just being his patient.

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Healthcare

Whole Foods, healthcare, and boycott

I find it fascinating to watch what happens when progressives discover what kind of a person the CEO of Whole Foods, John Mackey, is. Because his stores sell organic and healthy products, people automatically assumed he was a progressive like themselves. However, Mackey is the worst of fanatical libertarians, though it was only with the recent Wall Street Journal OpEd he wrote that people discovered this for themselves.

In the OpEd, Mackey came out against anything but a free market healthcare system. He states, unequivocally, that in his opinion, healthcare is not a right.

Health care is a service that we all need, but just like food and shelter it is best provided through voluntary and mutually beneficial market exchanges. A careful reading of both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution will not reveal any intrinsic right to health care, food or shelter. That’s because there isn’t any. This “right” has never existed in America.

Even in countries like Canada and the U.K., there is no intrinsic right to health care. Rather, citizens in these countries are told by government bureaucrats what health-care treatments they are eligible to receive and when they can receive them. All countries with socialized medicine ration health care by forcing their citizens to wait in lines to receive scarce treatments.

I leave those in other countries to respond to what Mackey says about your countries, and focus on what he said about this country.

Mackey lists changes he believes will solve the healthcare problems, including removing items that insurance companies are mandated to provide, allowing cross-state insurance sales, as well as tort reform.

However, as articles, such as this excellent article on healthcare costs in the New Yorker detail, healthcare costs are not driven by malpractice lawsuits, or government mandated health care coverage. If anything, the only thing has kept some small control over the healthcare companies are the state laws that don’t allow them to arbitrarily cancel healthcare coverage for the sick, and those who need care—that demand a minimum of responsibility from these companies.

Healthcare in the US has become nothing more than an exercise in earning profits. Until it’s redefined to what it should be, the care of people, costs will continue to increase exponentially, until eventually only the wealthy will be able to afford truly decent health care. The free market fails when it comes to basic humanity.

According to Mackey, if you’re sick and you can’t afford healthcare, why you should just die. I don’t know about any of you, but I have no interest in giving a man like this the time of day, much less my money. I have disliked Whole Foods with a passion for many years, both because of Mackey’s attitude, and the fact that the company grossly overcharges for its goods. To Mackey, organic and healthy are green marketing, a way to make lots of money.

Now others are discovering the truth of Whole Foods and Mackey, and have started a boycotting campaign, though how well it will do, is anyone’s guess. People have to make choices if they want to live what they believe, and that includes choosing where they spend their money. I can do without the “progressive” whose beliefs are nothing more than Twitter tweets and social media bon mots, and who isn’t willing to put their buying choices behind their beliefs.

But this is an easy one for me, because I’ve been boycotting Whole Foods for years.

update Good Good OpEd piece on this discussion at the NY Times. There are a lot of folks saying, but he’s so environmentally helpful, and has led the green revolution, and so on. Well, I look at it this way: he’s been amply rewarded for this effort. From now on, any money I give the store is payment for his latest efforts, and they have been both anti-union and now anti-healthcare. Whole Foods is not the only game in town when it comes to the environment. Not anymore.

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Healthcare

Why are all those states dark blue?

Now this is damn clever: using Google searches to trend flu outbreaks. Google is aggregating flu-related searches into trending where flu outbreaks might be occurring, or about to occur.

So far, knock on wood, the flu trend graph shows low activity for Missouri.